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The Simple Guide to Kickass Kombucha

It’s a big day everyone! The day your intestinal microbiota have been begging you for. The day you say goodbye to expensive store bought kombucha. The day you become a brewmaster as I impart on you the secrets of homemade kombucha!

The goal of this guide is to be your one stop shop for homemade kombucha brewage, from SCOBY-less to fermented perfection. No hopping around the interwebs. No fuss. No confusion. Because making homemade kombucha is so simple (albeit a bit slow), and I hope after reading this you’ll give it a whirl! Let’s hop right to it.

How to make homemade kombucha recipe with kombucha in a mason jar

How to Make Homemade Kombucha: Overview

This post will go into detail about each step in the process of making kombucha. For succinct instructions, scroll to the bottom where a recipe card lays out the basics of making homemade kombucha. The general order of things goes something like this (you can jump around this tutorial by clicking the links below):

  1. Make SCOBY (1 to 4 weeks) – to make the “mother”
  2. First Fermentation (6 to 10 days) – to make the actual kombucha
  3. Second Fermentation (3 to 10 days) – to carbonate the kombucha

You can also click to jump to a few useful resources:

How to Make Kombucha Video

Before we start, here are some general notes that are consistent throughout the whole homemade kombucha process.

  • No metal or plastic containers. Metal can react with the acidic kombucha and hurt your SCOBY, while plastic can house nasty bacteria that you don’t want sneaking in.
  • Clean is key. A recurring theme in kombucha brewing is that EVERYTHING must be CLEAN! We’re creating the perfect environment for good bacterial growth, but if a bad bacteria slips in, it could ruin your batch (and make you pretty sick).
  • Temperature plays a role. Fermentation goes a bit quicker in warmer temperatures, and a bit slower in colder.
  • No mold zone. If you see any mold growing on your SCOBY or in the tea (which I understand can be difficult to discern from the hideous SCOBY, but will generally be green, white, or black), then toss your whole batch.

Print the Homemade Kombucha Guide

By popular demand, I’ve created a printable PDF with all the instructions from this post. Enter your email below and I’ll send it to ya!

How to make homemade kombucha recipe flavored with kombucha flip top bottle

1. How to make a homemade kombucha SCOBY

The SCOBY (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast) is the mother of the kombucha, providing bacteria and yeast to ferment the sweet tea, protecting the tea from outside contaminants, and providing a loose seal to keep a bit of the carbonation in. Yes, it’s scary and alien looking and Buzzfeed did a whole article about how ugly this mama is…but it’s the very essence of kombucha! It brings the love and flavor and magic!

How to make homemade kombucha recipe holding a kombucha SCOBY mother

Making a SCOBY Ingredients:

  • 7 cups (1.6 L) clean water
  • ½ cup (100 g) white sugar
  • 4 bags black tea (or 1 Tbsp loose tea)
  • 1 cup (235 mL) unpasteurized, unflavored store bought kombucha
  • A large glass or ceramic container (two jars holding at least ½ gallon (1.9 L) each, or one jug holding at least 1 gallon (3.7 L)). Alternatively, use a glass jug with a built in spigot to make pouring the kombucha out easier!
  • Tightly woven cloth (coffee filters, paper towels, napkins, cheese cloth)
  • Rubberbands

Making a SCOBY Instructions:

  1. Bring water to a boil in a clean pot. Remove from heat and dissolve sugar into it.
  2. Add the tea and allow to steep while water cools to room temperature (a few hours). Only when water is at room temperature is it ready to work with (test by drawing out some water with a paper straw, using your finger to keep the ‘buch in the straw).
  3. Pour the sweetened tea into your jar(s), then pour store-bought kombucha in (if you’re using two jars, pour ½ of the storebought kombucha into each), making sure to include any little gunkies that may be at the bottom. These are good!
  4. Cover with a few layers of the tightly woven cloth (keeps out bugs and debris) and secure with a rubber band.
  5. Set somewhere dark, still, and room temperature (70-75 degrees F, 21-24 C), like a cupboard, for 1 to 4 weeks, until a ¼ inch (½ cm) SCOBY has formed.
  6. Keep SCOBY in its original tea until you’re ready to brew your first batch. The SCOBY should live and grow for years if treated with love. The tea you used to make the SCOBY, however, is very vinegary and should be tossed. Don’t use this tea as the starter to your first fermentation!

Things to note when making your SCOBY:

  • No decaf. The SCOBY doesn’t like decaf tea and will not grow as well if fed it (SCOBY = my spirit animal)
  • Only black tea. Similarly, the SCOBY doesn’t grow as well with green or fruity teas. By all means, once your SCOBY is big and strong you can use green tea, but for now stick with black.
  • No honey. Honey can contain botulism bacteria that, when grown exponentially as bacteria and yeast tend to do in kombucha, can be dangerous. You can use honey in the second fermentation, once there are a higher number of good bacteria to fight off the bad, but for now, stick to sugar.
  • Don’t mess with it! You won’t see anything but a few bubbles in the first few days. But then one day a thin, translucent layer will form, eventually thickening into a full on SCOBY. If it floats sideways or sinks, leave it! It’s just doing it’s SCOBY thang.
  • It’s all in the proportions. As I mentioned, I made two SCOBYs with this recipe, and you could probably make more. As long as you keep the proportions in check (7 c water : 1 c starter : 4 bags tea : 1/2 c sugar), you’ll be fine. Also note that this is the same proportion we’ll use in the first fermentation, but on a larger scale to make more ‘buch!
  • Got leftovers? Never throw your SCOBY away! Share the kombucha love by gifting it to a friend, or make it into a delicious gummy candy!
How to make kombucha
How to make homemade kombucha recipe with kombucha and SCOBY in a large jar

2. Homemade kombucha: The first fermentation

So you’ve got a newbie SCOBY and you’re ready to get this komboo-choo train rollin’. This first fermentation is where you actually make the kombucha.

First Fermentation Ingredients:

  • 14 cups (3.5 quarts, 3.3 L) clean water
  • 1 cup (200 g) white sugar
  • 8 bags black or green tea (or 2 Tbsp loose leaf)
  • 2 cups (470 mL) unflavored kombucha (either from a previous batch or unpasteurized, unflavored store bought kombucha
  • 1 or 2 SCOBYs (depending on how many containers you’re using, 1 per container)
  • A large glass or ceramic container (two jars holding at least ½ gallon (1.9 L) each, or one jug holding at least 1 gallon (3.7 L)). Alternatively, use a glass jug with a built in spigot to make pouring the kombucha out easier!
  • Tightly woven cloth (coffee filters, paper towels, napkins, cheese cloth)
  • Rubberbands

First Fermentation Instructions:

  1. Bring water to a boil in a clean pot. Remove from heat and dissolve sugar into it.
  2. Add the tea and allow to steep while water cools to room temperature (a few hours). Again, MUST be room temperature. Don’t risk killing your SCOBY in hot water.
  3. With hands AS CLEAN AS A SURGEON’S (really clean), gently remove your SCOBY from the tea and place on an equally as clean plate. You can rinse out the jar if you want (without soap), but it’s not necessary.
  4. Pour the sweetened tea into your jar(s), then pour in unflavored starter kombucha (if you’re using two jars, pour ½ of the starter kombucha into each).
  5. Gently place SCOBY into jar then cover with a few layers of the tightly woven cloth and secure with a rubber band.
  6. Set the jar(s) somewhere dark, still, and room temperature (70-75 degrees F, 21-24 C) for anywhere from 6 to 10 days. Begin tasting the tea at about 6 days by gently drawing out some of the tea with a paper straw (using your finger to hold the tea in the straw, don’t use your mouth). It should be mildly sweet and slightly vinegary.  The warmer the air temperature, the faster the kombucha will ferment. The longer the tea ferments, the more sugar molecules will be eaten up, the less sweet it will be.
  7. Reserve 2 cups from this batch to use as starter kombucha for your next batch (just leave it in the jar with SCOBY(s)). The rest can move into the second and final fermentation.

Things to note about the first fermentation:

  • In this step, unlike in the making of the SCOBY, you can use other teas besides black. Feel free to experiment with green, white, oolong, or combinations of them. Fruit teas should be mixed with a few black tea bags to ensure the SCOBY mama gets what she needs to thrive.
  • Once the SCOBY gets to be about an inch (2.5 cm) thick, peel off a few layers to create a second SCOBY (you can share the love and gift this to a friend!)
How to make homemade kombucha recipe with kombucha and SCOBY in a large jar

3. Homemade kombucha: The second fermentation

The final step and negotiably the best part of the process! The second fermentation is where the real magic happens. It’s where you can play around with sweet, fruity flavors that will not only make your homemade kombucha taste better than store-bought, but will give those good bacteria the power to kick it into high carbonation gear, bringing everything together into effervescent bliss. Let’s finish this.

Second Fermentation Ingredients:

  • Homemade kombucha from the first fermentation
  • Sweetener (fruit, honey, or sugar). Here are a few ideas per 1 cup kombucha:  
    • 1 to 2 Tbsp mashed fruit or fruit juice
    • A slice of orange
    • 1 to 2 tsp honey
    • a piece of peppermint candy
    • a piece of candied ginger
    • *to add chia seeds, see below under “things to note”
  • A few flip top fermentation bottles (bottles meant for fermentation have an airtight seal, which will prevent carbonation from escaping. If you don’t have these, canning jars will do an alright job, though they aren’t truly airtight.)

Second Fermentation Instructions:

  1. Strain kombucha and funnel into bottles, leaving about 1 1/2 inches at the top (3.8 cm).
  2. Add your chosen sweetener and seal tightly with lid.
  3. Let ferment somewhere dark and room temperature for 3 to 10 days.
  4. If desired, strain out fruit before serving. Place in fridge to slow the carbonation process.

Things to note about the second fermentation:

  • Your jars can explode if the pressure becomes too high! For your first few batches while you’re still getting the hang of how kombucha reacts to your environment, bottle a portion of it in a plastic bottle. This will act as a gauge for how the others are doing. When the plastic bottle is rock solid, the rest are probably done. “Burp” them by opening each to release some pressure, then place them in the refrigerator to slow fermentation.
  • Carefully open bottles over the sink with a towel in hand.
  • The more sugar/fruit you add, the faster the kombucha will ferment and become carbonated.
  • Chia seeds are my favorite addition to kombucha. Rather than adding these to the ‘buch when we add the sweetener, we’ll stir these in at the very end after the kombucha has been carbonated. Use 1 Tbsp of chia seeds per 1 cup of kombucha. Stir in the seeds and allow them to do their absorbing thang for a few hours, stirring every once in a while to keep them from clumping.
How to make homemade kombucha recipe flavored with kombucha flip top bottle and mason jars

Favorite Kombucha Flavors

I’m always experimenting with new flavors of kombucha. I’m always adding new kombucha flavors to this list, but here are a few of my favorites:

Mango Kombucha
Blueberry Kombucha

Ginger Pepper Kombucha
Pineapple Basil Kombucha
Strawberry Kombucha (perfect for a Kombucha Ice Cream Float)
Peach Pie Kombucha
Mojito Kombucha
Lemon Ginger Kombucha (great in a Kombucha Radler)
Apple Cinnamon Kombucha
Pumpkin Spice Kombucha

How to make homemade kombucha recipe flavored with kombucha flip top bottle

Supplies Needed for Making Kombucha

Below is a list of the supplies needed to make kombucha. The links are affiliate links, meaning I may earn a commission if you make a purchase (I’ve only included products I know and trust).

  • Black tea: Plain black tea lays the base for your kombucha.
  • Store bought starter tea: You’ll need a starter tea to get things going (but can use your home brewed kombucha to start the following batches).
  • Large glass or ceramic container: Aim for one that’s at least 1 gallon, but two 1/2 gallon jars will also work! I’ve also been using a large jar with a plastic spigot recently, and it makes pouring the kombucha so much easier.
  • Cheese cloth: Allows your kombucha to breathe while keeping dust and critters out.
  • Flip top fermentation bottles: These bottles have a tight seal specifically designed to keep the carbonation in (hellooo fizz!)
  • Starter kit: Want kombucha sooner than later? This bundle includes most of the equipment you need plus it comes with a ready-made SCOBY.
Hot to make kombucha

The Simple Guide to Kickass Kombucha

These instructions outline how to make homemade kombucha. For more in-depth instructions and tips, see the article above this recipe card.
Print Pin Rate
Course: Beverages (Non-Alcoholic)
Cuisine: American
Keyword: homemade kombucha, how to make a scoby, how to make kombucha, kombucha
Diet: Dairy-Free, Gluten-Free, Raw, Vegan, Vegetarian
Time: 60 minutes or more
Servings: 16 cups
Calories: 50kcal
Author: Sarah Bond
4.86 from 104 votes

INGREDIENTS

Making a SCOBY
First Fermentation
  • 14 cups clean water 3.5 quarts, 3.3 L
  • 1 cup white sugar 200 g
  • 8 bags black or green tea or 2 Tbsp loose leaf
  • 2 cups unflavored kombucha (from previous batch or store-bought kombucha) 470 mL
  • 1 or 2 SCOBYs 1 per container
Second Fermentation
  • Homemade kombucha from the first fermentation
  • Sweetener

INSTRUCTIONS

Making a SCOBY

  • Make Tea: Bring water to a boil in a clean pot. Remove from heat and dissolve sugar into it. Add the tea and allow to steep while water cools to room temperature. Only when water is at room temperature (test by drawing out some water with a straw), is it ready to work with!
  • Add Starter: Pour the sweetened tea into your jar(s), then pour store-bought kombucha in (if you’re using two jars, pour ½ of the store bought kombucha into each).
  • Ferment: Cover with a few layers of the tightly woven cloth and secure with a rubber band. Set somewhere dark and room temperature (70-75 degrees F, 21-24 C) for 1 to 4 weeks, until a ¼ inch (½ cm) SCOBY has formed.

First Fermentation

  • Make Tea: Bring water to a boil in a clean pot. Remove from heat and dissolve sugar into it. Add the tea and allow to steep while water cools to room temperature. 
  • Add Starter: With really clean hands, gently remove your SCOBY from the tea and place on a clean plate. Rinse out jar(s). Pour the sweetened tea into your jar(s), then pour in starter kombucha.
  • Ferment: Gently place SCOBY into jar then cover with a few layers of the tightly woven cloth and secure with a rubber band. Set the jar(s) somewhere dark and room temperature (70-75 degrees F, 21-24 C) for anywhere from 6 to 10 days. Begin tasting the tea at about 6 days by gently drawing out some of the tea with a straw.  The longer the tea ferments, the more sugar molecules will be eaten up, the less sweet it will be.
  • And Repeat: Reserve 2 cups from this batch to use as starter kombucha for your next batch (just leave it in the jar with the SCOBY(s)). The rest can move into the second fermentation.

Second Fermentation

  • Flavor: Strain kombucha and funnel into bottles, leaving about 1 1/2 inches at the top (3.8 cm). Add your chosen sweetener and seal tightly with lid.
  • Ferment: Let ferment somewhere dark and room temperature for 3 to 10 days.
  • Serve: If desired, strain out fruit before serving. Place in fridge to slow the carbonation process.

NUTRITION

Serving: 1cup (depends on fermentation length) | Calories: 50kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Sodium: 13mg | Sugar: 12g
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Homemade Kombucha FAQs

Can you get drunk off of kombucha? Most kombucha contains less than 0.5% ABV (for reference, beer has about 5% ABV), so it is not likely that you will get drunk from kombucha.

What are the side effects of kombucha? The high amount of probiotics in kombucha mean that drinking too much can lead to GI discomfort (bloating and in some cases diarrhea). Kombucha also contains caffeine and sugar, which may also effect you.

What are the health benefits of kombucha? Kombucha contains probiotics, which contribute to a healthy gut microbiome (and in turn, help regulate weight and obesity). It also contains antioxidants and polyphenols.

Can you put kombucha in the refrigerator? When you put kombucha in the refrigerator, fermentation slows down dramatically. You can therefore store it in the fridge if you need to take a break from fermenting, or to chill it prior to serving.

Can you use no-calorie sugars (like Stevia, Splenda etc.)? This is one of few recipes where you really cannot use sugar substitutes. BUT you won’t actually be consuming that whole 1 cup of sugar. The sugar is food for the bacteria and yeast. They’ll basically eat it all up and produce wonderful things like acidity and carbonation, and the finished kombucha will be much lower in sugar as a result.

My SCOBY sank to the bottom! Is it okay? Yes! Your kombucha SCOBY may sink or float around the container. This is totally normal and nothing to worry about. It will likely float back to the top eventually, or a second SCOBY may form on top (which is also okay).

How to make easy homemade kombucha, the fizzy fermented tea, with just 4 ingredients! All you need is black tea, sugar, water, and starter tea.

Homemade Kombucha: Bringing it all together

I drew this way professional depiction of the whole process for the visual learners. If you have any questions or hesitations about brewing homemade kombucha, don’t hesitate to comment below and I’ll help ya out! Happy brewing!

How to make homemade kombucha recipe diagram

Print the Homemade Kombucha Guide

By popular demand, I’ve created a printable PDF with all the instructions from this post. Enter your email below and it will be sent to you!

Hi, I’m Sarah!

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  1. Christ in CA says:

    Hi Sarah – I’ve been brewing for a few months now and things are going great! Unfortunately, with my last batch, I left the first fermentation in too long and the tea is too acidic. Is there anything I can do to save it or do I have to start over again. I know my SCOBY is still just fine… just trying to save the fermented tea.

    Thanks!

    1. Sarah says:

      You can try to offset it by adding more sugar or fruit in the second fermentation. Otherwise you can use it as something like a cooking vinegar. (With that said, the cost to make it was probably less than a dollar, so don’t feel bad about throwing it away and starting over!)

  2. Tasha says:

    Thank you for making this way less spooky, and OMG THANK YOU for the visual! It is so incredibly helpful, and took the anxiety away knowing what to do each step of the way!

    1. Sarah says:

      YAY! So happy to hear it’s useful for you. Happy brewing!

  3. Shelly says:

    I feel like my first fermentation is making another scoby. The top looks like gel.
    Normal or not?

    1. Sarah says:

      Totally normal! SCOBYs are a natural byproduct of kombucha fermentation.

  4. Laura says:

    Hi Sarah,

    Thanks for your article. I’m trying this out for the first time, starting from scratch, and am already seeing some SCOBY growth which is exciting to watch. I have a silly newbie question. I’m currently in the “grow your SCOBY” phase, can I take that liquid to second fermentation? Or do I need to chuck it (except for 2 cups) and start a new batch.

    Thanks for your resources! I can’t wait to try the recipes.

    1. Sarah says:

      That liquid will be way too sour to drink, so toss out all but 2 cups of it, which will kickstart your first ferm. Happy brewing!

  5. Colin Delisi says:

    Hello, first off, the Kombucha is amazing! Thank you so much!

    However, I do have a question (for anyone if they can answer!). I want to pause on the constant brewing, so I have the 2 cups of kombucha in my jar with my SCOBY but how do I keep it from going bad? Do I put it in the fridge, do I keep it room temp, do I air-tight seal it, etc.?

    Please help me so I am not drowning in Kombucha!

    Thank you! 🙂

  6. Vivian says:

    Thank you so much for such an amazing recipe! My SCOBY is big and healthy, and my kombucha tastes great! I’m also super happy to see all the answers you’ve left on the comments, they really help answer my questions too!

    I have another one to add: when storing the SCOBY for the next batch, do I seal the jar with a lid, or should I stick with the cloth?

    Thanks again so much <3

    1. Sarah says:

      Stick with the cloth! 😀

  7. Monica says:

    I am ready to start the first fermentation but have a question about the ‘starter tea’ ingredient. To clarify, this either needs to be store-bought kombucha or the final product of a previous batch of kombucha (what is produced after the second fermentation is complete)? This is my first brew, so I don’t have the latter, but want to confirm I need to buy another bottle of kombucha (which I did to make the scoby) and can’t use the tea in which I made my scoby. Thank you!

    1. Sarah says:

      Hi Monica! You actually can use the tea used to make the SCOBY (I previously recommended against this, but have since learned that it can be used). Otherwise, you can used finished kombucha from the first fermentation (or from the second fermentation, though it’s not needed to make the starter), or a bottle of unflavored store bought.

  8. Maeve says:

    Thank you so much for this detailed article! My SCOBY formed in 2 weeks and I just moved on to the first fermentation tonight. I have one question, when storing your homemade kombucha starter from the first fermentation, do we just keep it room temp in a cupboard? or should we refrigerate our starter? I poured out 2 cups of the homemade kombucha “starter” for future batches in a lidded mason jar and just put it next to my jars that have my SCOBY but I was not sure where to put it.5 stars

    1. Sarah says:

      I would refrigerate the starter (as long as the SCOBY isn’t in it) so that the fermentation slows down. I like to keep extra starter in the fridge in case I need some – it’ll stay good virtually forever!

  9. Eva Petric says:

    Hello Sara! Thank you for all your explanation! I think i will try to make a Scoby without a starter…i hope it is possible!?5 stars

    1. Sarah says:

      Hi Eva, you do need the starter to make the SCOBY, otherwise the right bacteria and yeast won’t be present. Here’s where you can find the starter!

  10. Alex says:

    Hi Sarah
    Thank you for the clear and concise instructions, really helpful.

    Between brews, what are you doing with you SCOBYs? Storing them in a little leftover kombucha until the next batch? (If so, if so how long will they last like this?
    Or are you just constantly making batches?
    Thanks!

    1. Sarah says:

      I just constantly have a batch going so the SCOBY is never not working (though occasionally I’ll just let it sit in the 2 cups of starter tea for a few days if I don’t have time to start the next batch). For a break longer than a few days, here’s some things you can do.

  11. Alexis says:

    This is an awesome and easy to follow guide!! Thank you so much. Question: I am looking for GT’S Original Kombucha to start growing my SCOBY, but GT’s Original now has kiwi juice listed as an ingredient and I’m having a difficult time finding their Original flavor without kiwi juice. Is it safe to use the GT’s Original with kiwi juice?

    1. Sarah says:

      Hi Alexis! I noticed this recently too – so weird! It should still be okay to use though.

  12. Holly Hayhurst says:

    So I made the mango and mojito variations, used a plastic bottle to test carbonation, and only did 4 days of 2nd fermentation. The plastic bottle felt full and ready, so I didnt ferment longer, for fear of exploding bottles. When I opened the sealed glass bottles, the first basically exploded and I lost over half the liquid– and the remaining liquid wasnt even carbonated that much?!

    Help! That was my first batch, so i realize there will be trial and error, but I’m terrified of opening the finished product if I ferment longer the next time!

    1. Sarah says:

      Hi Holly! Try burping the bottles everyday to release extra carbonation. You can also open them with a clean plastic baggie over the top, setting the whole bottle in a large bowl. This will catch the kombucha that may foam out 😀

  13. Robyn Coonan says:

    Hi Sarah. I have been brewing kombucha successful for 12 months, but recently we went away for 2 weeks and since then my second fermentations aren’t developing effervescent. What could be possible causes.

    1. Sarah says:

      Hi Robyn! It could just have run out of “food” a bit. You might try reinvigorating it with a bit of sugar and/or a bottle of unflavored store bought if you can get your hands on it.

  14. Drew says:

    Thanks Sarah for the guide! I have been having trouble finding original, unflavored, unfiltered kombucha and started my first SCOBY with the Trilogy flavor from GT’s. Will this work or do I need to keep looking for that unsweetened flavor?

    1. Sarah says:

      Trilogy has some added flavors that may impact the fermentation. Here are some ideas for where you can find unflavored kombucha.

  15. melanie says:

    Hi
    i am loving the Kombucha making however i am finding that i am onto my third batch still using the mother scoby and my 2nd fermentation’s are growing their own scobys and not fizzing ? any ideas on what is wrong ?
    thanks

    1. Sarah says:

      It’s totally normal to have SCOBYs developing in the 2F. You can discard them or add them to smoothies. Here are some troubleshooting tips to help you get more fizz!

  16. Tiffani says:

    Can I use fresh squeezed juice when I get ready to do get ready to do the second fermentation? It would be a mixture of fruit, veggies & citrus?

    1. Sarah says:

      Yep, that would be great! 😀

  17. Zachary says:

    Hello!

    After i go through my first fermentation, can i save that scoby? I started from scratch and was able to produce about a 1″ scoby. I am now starting the first fermentation. After this fermentation is done and i bottle it up for the 2nd part of fermentation w/ fruit, can i save the scoby in a jar with some of the existing kombucha?

    1. Sarah says:

      Yep, you can save it in a cloth-covered jar with some kombucha until your next round of first fermentation. I wouldn’t wait too long though, about 1 week max.

  18. Reagan says:

    Hi! This guide has been super helpful! I was gifted a scoby and had no idea how to do this, but I’m on my second fermentation now and everything looks and tastes great already! Do you have to complete the second fermentation, or is it only to infuse flavours and carbonate the kombucha?5 stars

    1. Sarah says:

      Yay, so awesome to hear it, Reagan! You don’t have to do the second fermentation. It’s purely for flavor and carbonation. The kombucha is drinkable right out of the first ferm 😀

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